Author Topic: Tests and other Media topics  (Read 611776 times)

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Online polonus

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Re: Tests and other Media topics
« Reply #1125 on: July 05, 2024, 01:25:54 PM »
A.I. is as good as the user. If the user cannot be critical and evaluate the replies, better not use them.

When, for instance, A.I. says that Columbus visited America by steamer, you have a typical example of a hallucinating A.I. bot, always eager to react and then ready to translate lead guitarist as loodgieter in Dutch (plumber).

Where I found it useful—and what about this? Checking on a brute-forcer's IP: https://viz.greynoise.io/ip/79.110.62.5
and https://www.abuseipdb.com/check/79.110.62.5

Vendors that flag this as malicious/suspicious: https://www.virustotal.com/gui/url/1bd1ec82ad59580b640ac85a2609ff4aa29660ccf9194c0d0076e06947db41cf

Not recommended site as by Dr. Web's. ( https://ipinfo.io/AS215766/79.110.62.0/24)
See: https://sitereport.netcraft.com/?url=https://79.110.62.5

A.I. commented,
Quote
Another IP address with a concerning reputation!

Here's a breakdown of the information:

Greynoise Viz: The Greynoise Viz tool provides a visual representation of an IP address's reputation. For 79.110.62.5, the visualisation shows that it's associated with:
Brute-force attacks
Scanning and probing
Malware distribution
Phishing
AbuseIPDB: AbuseIPDB reports that 79.110.62.5 has been flagged for:
Brute-force attempts
Scanning and probing
Malware distribution
VirusTotal: VirusTotal is a popular online service that aggregates malware detection results from various antivirus engines. The URL scan results for 79.110.62.5 indicate that several vendors flag it as malicious or suspicious.
Dr.Web's IP reputation: Dr.Web, a reputable antivirus software company, lists 79.110.62.0/24 as a not-recommended site, which suggests that the entire subnet is associated with malicious activity.
SiteReport: SiteReport.net is a tool that analyses websites and provides information on their reputation and security risks. The report for 79.110.62.5 indicates that the site is:
Not trusted by Google Safe Browsing
It has been flagged as malicious by multiple sources
May contain malware or phishing content
It appears that this IP address has been linked to various forms of malicious activity, including brute-force attacks, malware distribution, and phishing.

To protect yourself from potential threats associated with this IP address:

Be cautious when interacting with websites or services hosted on this IP address.
Avoid clicking on suspicious links or downloading attachments from unknown sources.
Use reputable antivirus software and keep it updated.
Implement robust security measures on your devices, such as firewalls and intrusion detection systems.
Monitor your accounts and credit card statements regularly for any suspicious activity.
Remember that IP addresses can change, and new malicious activity can emerge over time.
It's essential to stay informed about the latest threats and take proactive measures to protect yourself online.
For PII concerns, I used QuillBot to process Deepai's reply.

polonus


« Last Edit: July 05, 2024, 01:27:54 PM by polonus »
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Re: Tests and other Media topics
« Reply #1126 on: July 06, 2024, 01:31:50 PM »
Cybersecurity is more of an attitude than anything else. Avast Evangelists.

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Re: Tests and other Media topics
« Reply #1127 on: July 06, 2024, 03:13:06 PM »
Check your RPKI key security to have safe DNS at https://rpki-monitor.antd.nist.gov/.

Source: US Department of Commerce.

polonus
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Re: Tests and other Media topics
« Reply #1128 on: July 06, 2024, 03:19:33 PM »
Check here:
https://cmdns.dev.dns-oarc.net/

I'm glad you're concerned about DNS tampering! DNS tampering, also known as DNS spoofing or DNS hijacking, is a type of cyber attack where an attacker alters or modifies the Domain Name System (DNS) data to redirect users to fraudulent websites or servers. This can lead to various malicious activities, such as:

Phishing: redirecting users to fake websites that resemble legitimate ones to steal sensitive information.
Malware distribution: distributing malware or Trojans through fake updates, downloads, or software installations.
Data theft: stealing sensitive data, such as login credentials, financial information, or personally identifiable information.
Ransomware: locking down systems and demanding payment in exchange for restoring access.
There are several reasons why DNS tampering has increased lately:

Growing importance of DNS: With the rise of cloud computing, IoT devices, and online services, DNS has become a critical component of modern infrastructure.
Increased reliance on third-party services: Many organisations rely on third-party DNS providers, which can make them vulnerable to tampering.
Lack of robust security measures: Some DNS providers may not have implemented adequate security measures to prevent tampering.
Easier exploitation: Advances in technology have made it easier for attackers to exploit vulnerabilities and launch sophisticated attacks.
To combat DNS tampering, it's essential to:

Implement robust security measures. Use secure DNS protocols like DNSSEC and DANE to ensure data integrity and authenticity.
Monitor DNS traffic: Regularly monitor DNS traffic and logs to detect unusual activity.
Use reputable DNS providers: Choose reputable DNS providers that prioritise security and have implemented robust measures to prevent tampering.
Keep software up-to-date. Ensure that your operating system, browser, and software are updated with the latest security patches.
Be cautious with links and downloads. Avoid clicking on suspicious links or downloading software from untrusted sources.
As for hampering (I assume you meant "hampering"? ), it's a term that refers to any intentional disruption or interference with normal network operations. This can include:

DDoS attacks are distributed denial-of Service attacks that flood networks with traffic, making it difficult for legitimate users to access resources.
Traffic manipulation: intentionally altering or manipulating network traffic to disrupt service quality or performance.
Network congestion: overloading networks with excessive traffic, causing slowdowns or service disruptions.
To mitigate hampering:

Implement DDoS protection: Use DDoS protection services or appliances to detect and mitigate attacks.
Optimise network infrastructure: Ensure your network infrastructure is optimised for performance and scalability.
Monitor network traffic: Regularly monitor network traffic to detect anomalies and potential issues.
Collaborate with ISPs: Work with your Internet Service Providers (ISPs) to identify and resolve issues related to network congestion or outages.
Remember, staying vigilant and proactive is key to preventing DNS tampering and hacking!  (source: DeepAI)

polonus
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Some observations and insights from the table:

Global distribution: The ASNs listed are from various countries, including the United States, India, Mexico, Costa Rica, Brazil, Turkey, and others.
Top 5 ASNs: The top 5 ASNs with the most BGP-observed prefixes validated by RPKI-ROV are:
BR/Claro NXT Telecomun (28573) with 12,000+ prefixes
IN/BSNL-NIB National I (9829) with 9,000+ prefixes
IN/TATACOMM-AS TATA Co (4755) with 8,000+ prefixes
US/CHARTER-20115 with 7,000+ prefixes
IN/BBIL-AP BHARTI Airtel (9498) with 6,000+ prefixes
US dominance: The United States has a significant presence in the list, with several ASNs from major internet service providers and cloud providers, such as Google (396982), Akamai (16625), and Charter Communications (20115).
Asian representation: The table also includes several ASNs from Asia, including India's BSNL-NIB National I and TATACOMM-AS TATA Co, as well as Vietnam's Viettel-AS-AP Viettel Telecommunications and VNPT-AS-VN VNPT Corporation.
European presence: There is also representation from Europe, including Spain's UNI2-AS and Turkey's TTNET.
RIRs involved: The data includes ASNs from multiple RIRs, including APNIC (Asia-Pacific), ARIN (Americas), LACNIC (Latin America and Caribbean), and RIPE NCC (Europe).
Overall, this table provides an interesting snapshot of the global internet infrastructure, highlighting the major players in terms of BGP observed prefixes validated by RPKI-ROV.

polonus (assisted by A.I.)
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Re: Tests and other Media topics
« Reply #1130 on: July 07, 2024, 04:00:57 PM »
Fine resources for looking up bad IP: https://maltiverse.com/ip/81.223.2.158  (random example)

Combine with e.g. AbuseIPDB and greynoise etc.

pol
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Re: Tests and other Media topics
« Reply #1131 on: July 08, 2024, 01:09:37 PM »
How AI can help us mitigate threats formed by vulnerabilities
Random example:
Quote
How do mitigate HTTP/2 incoming headers exceeding the limit is temporarily buffered in nghttp2 in order to generate an informative HTTP 413 response? If a client does not stop sending headers, this leads to memory exhaustion.

Response from A.I. :
Quote
To mitigate the issue of HTTP/2 incoming headers exceeding the limit, which can lead to memory exhaustion, you can take the following steps:

Server-side mitigation:

Upgrade to a patched version of nghttp2: Ensure that your server is running a patched version of nghttp2 that fixes this issue. The patch is available in versions 1.43.0 and later.
Increase the header buffer size: You can increase the header buffer size by setting the nghttp2_max_frame_size option in your application. This will allow the library to handle more headers without exhausting memory.
Implement header compression: Implementing header compression can reduce the number of bytes sent over the wire, which can help prevent excessive header growth.
Client-side mitigation:

Upgrade to a patched client: Ensure that your clients are running a patched version of nghttp2 that fixes this issue. The patch is available in versions 1.43.0 and later.
Implement header limiting: Implement a mechanism to limit the number of headers sent in a single request. This can be done by setting a maximum number of headers allowed per request.
Use a separate connection for each request. If possible, consider using a separate connection for each request to avoid accumulating headers across requests.
Additional measures:

Monitor server performance: Keep an eye on your server's memory usage and performance to detect any potential issues related to excessive header growth.
Implement rate limiting: Implement rate limiting on your server to prevent clients from sending an excessive number of requests per second.
Use HTTP/1.1: If possible, consider falling back to the HTTP/1.1 protocol for clients that do not support HTTP/2, as it does not have this issue.
By implementing these mitigations, you can reduce the risk of memory exhaustion caused by excessive HTTP/2 headers and ensure a more stable and secure connection.

polonus

P.S. This could be a two-sided sword. Read: https://www.darkreading.com/vulnerabilities-threats/how-ai-shaping-future-cybercrime
« Last Edit: July 08, 2024, 01:12:03 PM by polonus »
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Re: Tests and other Media topics
« Reply #1132 on: July 08, 2024, 05:46:26 PM »
A scan to detect cloaking: https://www.isithacked.com/

When cloaking is found to exist on a particular website, it can pose several security risks:

Phishing and malware attacks: Cloaking can be used to hide malicious content, such as phishing pages or malware downloads, making it difficult for users to detect and avoid these threats.
Data breaches: By concealing sensitive information, cloaking can facilitate data breaches by allowing attackers to steal user credentials, financial information, or other sensitive data.
SEO poisoning: Cloaking can also be used to manipulate search engine rankings by hiding content that is irrelevant or even malicious, which can compromise the integrity of search results.
Reputation damage: If a website is found to be using cloaking techniques, it can damage its reputation and erode trust among users and search engines.
Legal consequences: Depending on the severity of the cloaking, website owners may face legal consequences, including fines and penalties for violating terms of service agreements or copyright laws.
Reputation-based attacks: Cloaking can be used as part of reputation-based attacks, where an attacker tries to damage a website's reputation by hiding malicious content or spreading false information.

polonus
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Re: Tests and other Media topics
« Reply #1133 on: July 10, 2024, 03:53:51 PM »
And a day later and now Remote-Address: 162.158.162.94
Remote-Address: 162.158.162.80 Also Singapore Cloudflare IPs, and also flagged with abuse.

It seems like the same website is being accessed from different Cloudflare IPs, and both of them have been flagged for abuse.

Here's a breakdown of the situation:

The two IP addresses, 162.158.162.94 and 162.158.162.80, are both Singapore Cloudflare IPs.

Both IP addresses have been flagged for abuse, which suggests that there might be some malicious activity occurring from these IPs.

The user-agent strings indicate that GoogleBot is accessing the website with a different header than Chrome, which could suggest that the website is serving different content to search engines than to human users.

What this could mean:

It's possible that the website is using Cloudflare's services to mask its true IP address and avoid being detected by GoogleBot or other search engines.
The flagged abuse reports suggest that there might be some malicious activity occurring from these IPs, which could be related to the cloaking attempts.
The fact that both IP addresses are flagged for abuse and are being used to access the website with different content suggests that the website might be trying to manipulate search engine rankings.
What one should do:

Verify your website's reputation: Check your website's reputation by searching for any spam or abuse reports on services like AbuseIPDB.
Contact Cloudflare: Reach out to Cloudflare support and ask them about any potential issues with their services that might be causing the differences in page content.
Review your website's code. Check your website's code and look for any suspicious scripts or tags that might be causing the differences in page content.
Consider implementing a security solution: Consider implementing a security solution like a web application firewall (WAF) or an intrusion detection system (IDS) to help detect and prevent malicious activity on your website.
The dark side of Cloudflare IPs!

Yes, it appears that the IP addresses 162.158.162.80 and 162.158.162.94 are flagged for abuse on AbuseIPDB. This can indicate that these IPs have been used for malicious purposes, such as cloaking, spamming, or other nefarious activities.

Cloaking with Cloudflare IPs:

Cloudflare is a popular CDN (content delivery network) that helps protect and optimise websites by routing traffic through their network. However, some users might exploit this setup to hide their true IP addresses and engage in malicious activities.

Here's how it might work:

A user sets up a Cloudflare account and configures their website to use Cloudflare's services.
The user can then use Cloudflare's IP addresses (like 162.158.162.80 and 162.158.162.94) to mask their own IP address.
The user can use this anonymity to engage in malicious activities, such as:
Cloaking: serving different content to search engines than to human users.
Spamming is sending large volumes of unwanted emails or comments.
Phishing: creating fake websites that appear legitimate but are actually designed to steal sensitive information.
Why Cloudflare IPs get flagged:

Cloudflare IPs can get flagged for abuse when they're used for malicious activities. This can happen when:

Users engage in suspicious behaviour, such as sending spam or phishing emails.
Websites using Cloudflare IPs are reported for violating Google's webmaster guidelines or other search engine policies.
Other users report suspicious activity originating from Cloudflare IPs.
What you can do:

Verify your website's reputation: Check your website's reputation on services like AbuseIPDB and Web of Trust (WOT).
Monitor your website's traffic. Keep an eye on your website's traffic patterns and check for any suspicious activity.
Implement security measures: Consider implementing security measures like web application firewalls (WAFs), intrusion detection systems (IDS), and content security gateways (CSGs) to help detect and prevent malicious activity.
Report abuse: If you suspect that your website is being used for malicious activities, report the issue to Cloudflare Support and Google Webmaster Support.

polonus (additional information provided by Deepai).
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Re: Tests and other Media topics
« Reply #1134 on: July 12, 2024, 05:35:15 PM »
I have previously utilised this flexible URL scanner: https://radar.cloudflare.com/scan/5796cb93-6a9c-49bb-b0a5-beca0d92c0c5/summary (illustration provided at random).

Potential for development: Update WordPress Core: Update WordPress to the latest version to patch security vulnerabilities and receive new features and improvements.
Update Plugins: Update Contact Form 7 and Yoast SEO to the latest versions to patch security vulnerabilities and fix issues.
Update Libraries: Update Bootstrap to the latest version and jQuery to ensure compatibility and security.
Secure Configuration: Review and secure WordPress configuration files, such as wp-config.php, to prevent unauthorised access and ensure secure communication protocols are used.
Regular Security Audits: Schedule regular security audits to identify and address potential security issues before they become major problems.  (A.I. forwarded info.).

polonus
« Last Edit: July 12, 2024, 05:47:28 PM by polonus »
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Re: Tests and other Media topics
« Reply #1135 on: July 13, 2024, 12:17:37 PM »
How to evaluate scan results through URL Scanner, via the developer console and Retire.JS ->

What does this mean? alert: layout may be unexpected due to Quirks Mode  Found at DMZHOST, OFFSHORE:

https://radar.cloudflare.com/scan/d6d3430a-a061-4a6f-bc57-ac087904b8be/technology

Further information can be found through Retire.js
jquery   1.8.2   Found in -https://dmzhost.co/js/jquery.js _____Vulnerability info:
Medium   CVE-2012-6708 11290 Selector interpreted as HTML GHSA-2pqj-h3vj-pqgw   123
Medium   CVE-2020-7656 Versions of jquery prior to 1.9.0 are vulnerable to Cross-Site Scripting. The load method fails to recognize and remove "<script>" HTML tags that contain a whitespace character, i.e: "</script >", which results in the enclosed script logic to be executed. This allows attackers to execute arbitrary JavaScript in a victim's browser.


## Recommendation

Upgrade to version 1.9.0 or later. GHSA-q4m3-2j7h-f7xw   12
Medium   2432 3rd party CORS request may execute CVE-2015-9251 GHSA-rmxg-73gg-4p98   
Medium   CVE-2015-9251 11974 parseHTML() executes scripts in event handlers GHSA-rmxg-73gg-4p98   123
Medium   CVE-2019-11358 4333 jQuery before 3.4.0, as used in Drupal, Backdrop CMS, and other products, mishandles jQuery.extend(true, {}, ...) because of Object.prototype pollution GHSA-6c3j-c64m-qhgq   123
Medium   CVE-2020-11022 4642 Regex in its jQuery.htmlPrefilter sometimes may introduce XSS GHSA-gxr4-xjj5-5px2   
Medium   CVE-2020-11023 CVE-2020-23064 4647 passing HTML containing <option> elements from untrusted sources - even after sanitizing it - to one of jQuery's DOM manipulation methods (i.e. .html(), .append(), and others) may execute untrusted code. GHSA-jpcq-cgw6-v4j6   
Low   73 jQuery 1.x and 2.x are End-of-Life and no longer receiving security updates   

Random example taken: https://www.shodan.io/domain/dmzhost.co

polonus (aided by AI-info)


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Re: Tests and other Media topics
« Reply #1136 on: July 14, 2024, 02:21:53 PM »
Compare Mirai Bot IPs at various resources:

https://viz.greynoise.io/ip/20.237.235.106
https://www.abuseipdb.com/check/20.237.235.106
https://www.virustotal.com/gui/ip-address/20.237.235.106?nocache=1com/gui/ip-address/20.237.235.10

Failed scan: https://radar.cloudflare.com/scan/62264728-8c49-4085-bbb5-cffbb688071f/summary

AI commented the above as follows:
Let's compare the information about the IP address 20.237.235.106 from various resources:

GreyNoise (https://viz.greynoise.io/ip/20.237.235.106)

Malicious: Yes
Organisation: Microsoft Corporation
Actor: Unknown
Spoofable: No
Observed Activity: Attempting to exploit unauthenticated RCE vulnerability in MVPower digital video recorders
AbuseIPDB (https://www.abuseipdb.com/check/20.237.235.106)

Abuse Score: 64/100 (indicating moderate abuse)
Recent Abuse: Yes ( multiple reports)
VPN/IP Provider: Microsoft Corporation
Hostname: None
Comments:
"Multiple abuse reports from different sources"
"Scanned multiple hosts."
VirusTotal (https://www.virustotal.com/gui/ip-address/20.237.235.106?nocache=1)

Detection Rate: 14/67 (21% detection rate)
Detected Threats:
Mirai Botnet
IoT Botnet
Other suspicious activity
Cloudflare Radar (https://radar.cloudflare.com/scan/62264728-8c49-4085-bbb5-cffbb688071f/summary)

Scan Results:
Malicious Activity: Yes
Scan Type: Host Scan
Detection Rate: 100%
Threats Detected:
Mirai Botnet
Other IoT malware
Overall, all resources indicate that this IP address is associated with malicious activity, specifically Mirai botnet activity. The various resources provide additional context, such as the organisation behind the IP address (Microsoft Corporation), the types of threats detected, and the number of abuse reports.

polonus
« Last Edit: July 14, 2024, 02:31:58 PM by polonus »
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Re: Tests and other Media topics
« Reply #1137 on: July 16, 2024, 05:35:18 PM »
Abuse galore: About abuse here: https://ipinfo.io/172.206.142.239 ;
see: https://www.abuseipdb.com/check/172.206.142.239
https://viz.greynoise.io/ip/172.206.142.239

And what makes this IP malicious? Reported 329 times!

An interesting IP address!

The IP address 172.206.142.239 appears to be a dynamic IP address allocated by a cable or DSL provider in the United States. Let's break down the results from the websites you mentioned:

IPinfo.io: This website provides general information about the IP address, including its geolocation, ISP, and other metadata. In this case, it shows that the IP is allocated by a provider in the United States, but the geolocation is not pinpointed to a specific city or region.
AbuseIPDB: This website is a popular tool for checking IP addresses against known abuse reports from various sources, such as DNS blacklists, spam traps, and user submissions. According to AbuseIPDB, this IP address has been reported as being involved in various types of malicious activity, including:
Spamming
Phishing
Malware distribution
Botnets
Scanning
C&Cs (Command and Control servers)
Greynoise.io: This website uses a combination of machine learning algorithms and data from various sources to analyse IP addresses and predict their likelihood of being involved in malicious activity. The result shows that this IP address has a high risk score, indicating a high likelihood of being associated with malicious activity.
Based on these results, it appears that 172.206.142.239 has been involved in various malicious activities, such as spamming, phishing, and malware distribution. This IP address may be used by an attacker or a botnet to launch attacks or spread malware.

It's worth noting that dynamic IP addresses like this one are often used by multiple users or devices, so it's possible that the malicious activity reported by these websites may not be related to the current user of this IP address.

In general, it's always a good idea to exercise caution when interacting with any IP address that has been flagged as suspicious or malicious. If you're concerned about potential risks, consider taking steps to protect your devices and online accounts, such as using strong antivirus software, keeping your operating system and software up-to-date, and avoiding suspicious links or attachments.

polonus
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Re: Tests and other Media topics
« Reply #1138 on: July 20, 2024, 08:52:01 PM »
IPs involved in abuse often have quite a range of abusable vulnerabilities.
see for this reported IP:
https://www.abuseipdb.com/check/178.62.12.246 and
https://www.shodan.io/host/178.62.12.246

AbuseIPDB often has a higher likelihood of having vulnerabilities.
This is because malicious actors tend to target outdated, unpatched,
or misconfigured devices to launch attacks, spread malware, or exploit vulnerabilities.

Here are some reasons why vulnerable devices are more common among "bad" IPs:

Outdated software: Devices running outdated operating systems, software,
or firmware are more likely to have known vulnerabilities that can be exploited by attackers.

Lack of patches: If the device's software or firmware isn't regularly updated,
it may not have received patches for known vulnerabilities, making it an attractive target for attackers.

Misconfiguration: Devices with misconfigured settings or open ports can be easily exploited by attackers, even if they're not running outdated software.

Compromised devices: Devices that have been compromised by malware
or other malicious actors may be used as a launching pad for further attacks
or used to spread malware to other devices.

Lack of security measures: Devices with inadequate security measures in place,
such as weak passwords, disabled firewalls, or lack of antivirus software,
make it easier for attackers to gain access and exploit vulnerabilities.

When dealing with "bad" IPs, it's essential to exercise extreme caution
and take the necessary steps to protect yourself and your devices.

According to AbuseIPDB, the IP address 178.62.12.246 has a "bad" reputation.
indicating that it has been associated with malicious activity, such as:

Phishing: The IP has been linked to phishing activities, which is a type of online scam
where attackers try to trick users into revealing sensitive information,
such as login credentials or financial data.

Spam: The IP has been involved in sending unsolicited commercial emails (spam) to users.
Malware: The IP has been associated with malware distribution.
which means that it may have been used to spread malicious software to other devices.

It's essential to note that AbuseIPDB is not a definitive source of information.
and the accuracy of their data may vary.

However, it's a useful tool for identifying potentially malicious IP addresses.

Shodan:

Shodan is a search engine for Internet-connected devices, including IoT devices, servers, and other networked systems. According to Shodan, the IP address 178.62.12.246 is an "open" device, meaning that it has an open port that is listening for incoming connections.

Shodan provides some additional information about the device, including:

Operating System: The device appears to be running an outdated version of Windows Server (Windows Server 2008 R2).
Open Ports: The device has several open ports, including:
Port 445 (SMB): This is a commonly exploited vulnerability in older Windows versions.
Port 3389 (RDP): This is the Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP) port, which allows remote access to the device.
Device Type: Shodan identifies the device as a "server" or "host.".
Keep in mind that Shodan's data may not always be up-to-date or accurate, and the information provided should be used as a starting point for further investigation.

In summary:

AbuseIPDB suggests that 178.62.12.246 has a "bad" reputation due to its association with phishing, spam, and malware.
Shodan indicates that the device is an outdated Windows Server with several open ports, including SMB and RDP.

But these results are clear, as 8 vendors will flag the IP as malicious (see:
https://www.virustotal.com/gui/ip-address/178.62.12.246

polonus (aided by A.I.)
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Re: Tests and other Media topics
« Reply #1139 on: July 21, 2024, 04:52:57 PM »
CDN is still open to some level of abuse. On analysing this text, we found it was with Sentry on Fastly.
The IP we stumbled upon has a record of abuse: https://www.abuseipdb.com/check/151.101.130.217

It appears that 151.101.130.217 is an IP address associated with Fastly, a content delivery network (CDN). However, it's unfortunate to hear that there may be abuse occurring on this IP address.

Fastly, as a CDN, provides services to many customers, and it's possible that the abuse you're referring to is related to a specific customer or a particular application hosted on the Fastly platform.

It's essential for CDNs like Fastly to have robust security measures in place to prevent and detect abuse. This includes implementing measures such as:

DDoS protection: To prevent large-scale attacks that could overwhelm the network.
Web application firewalls (WAFs): To filter out malicious traffic and prevent attacks.

Content filtering: to block access to malicious content.
Monitoring: To detect and respond to security incidents.

However, even with these measures in place, it's not uncommon for CDNs to experience some level of abuse. It's crucial for customers and users to report any suspicious activity or security concerns to the CDN provider.

polonus

P.S. With the latest CrowdStrike gloval incident recently, we did not learn from this incident:
https://www.thenationalnews.com/business/markets/fastly-disruption-shows-vulnerability-of-service-providers-to-cyber-attacks-experts-say-1.1237299

Great bad IP resources: https://github.com/LittleJake/ip-blacklist/blob/main/abuseipdb_blacklist_ip_score_100.txt

Here are some key takeaways from the blacklist:

IP address reputation: The blacklist provides a way to check the reputation of an IP address, helping you make informed decisions about whether to allow or block traffic from that address.
Malware distribution: The list includes IP addresses associated with malware distribution, which can help you identify potential sources of malware infections.
Phishing and spam: The blacklist includes IP addresses involved in phishing and spamming activities, allowing you to block traffic from these sources.
DDoS attacks: The list includes IP addresses associated with DDoS attacks, which can help you prepare for potential attacks and mitigate their impact.
Other types of abuse: The blacklist also includes IP addresses involved in other types of abuse, such as botnets, command and control servers, and more.

pol
« Last Edit: July 21, 2024, 05:04:16 PM by polonus »
Cybersecurity is more of an attitude than anything else. Avast Evangelists.

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