Author Topic: All about system restore.  (Read 4714 times)

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Offline polonus

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All about system restore.
« on: May 01, 2006, 01:54:30 PM »
Hi malware fighters,

Want to know all about system restore in XP. This is the site for ye: http://bertk.mvps.org/

greets,

polonus
Cybersecurity is more of an attitude than anything else. Avast Evangelists.

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Offline DavidR

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Re: All about system restore.
« Reply #1 on: May 01, 2006, 04:36:34 PM »
Good find Polonus, a whole site about system restore, I almost feel guilty about having it completely disabled ;D

I'm sure it will come in handy for many to bookmark.
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Staind

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Re: All about system restore.
« Reply #2 on: May 01, 2006, 04:42:20 PM »
I actually don't use system restore either, I find it a trap for viruses and spyware - and even if you do restore the system I find that some applications, specifically antivirus software and drivers, get messed up in the process - better just to format, unless you have important data that you need.

Offline DavidR

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Re: All about system restore.
« Reply #3 on: May 01, 2006, 05:06:56 PM »
As you mention there are things that it simply doesn't cover and the fact that system restore isn't infallible.

I do a regular weekly disk image (takes minutes to create and minutes to restore an exact image of the disk or partition) and daily back-up of data files. This takes much less time that tracking down issues  or trying to use system restore.

There are many, many reasons why a System Restore may fail. For example, see "Why are previous restore points not working?" in the "Troubleshooting" section of this official Microsoft page:
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/winxppro/plan/faqsrwxp.mspx

There's lots more on that page that's worth reading too. Note especially the sections on "Does System Restore protect personal data files?" (the short answer: no); "What should I do if System Restore does not work?"; "Why are my restore points missing or deleted?"; "Why does the System Restore Wizard lockup?"; and so on. Just a few minutes on that page ought to convince just about anyone that System Restore is not intended for heavy-duty system protection!
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CharleyO

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Re: All about system restore.
« Reply #4 on: May 01, 2006, 05:45:31 PM »
***

Now bookmarked ... thanks, Polonus!    :)


***

Starfighter

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Re: All about system restore.
« Reply #5 on: May 04, 2006, 12:27:23 AM »
System Restore is brain dead and won't back up the entire registry.   You are better off using a free program named ERUNT which can be downloaded from here:

http://www.larshederer.homepage.t-online.de/erunt/

(deactivate System Restore if you're going to use ERUNT)

Also, on that webpage is a prog named NTREGOPT, which is great for compacting the registry.

I use both programs, they are fantastic.  Highly recommended.


Mastertech

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Re: All about system restore.
« Reply #6 on: May 04, 2006, 08:51:24 AM »
System Restore is good to have running as an added layer of recovery. I've used it successfully numerous times. It does not restore everything but will fix problems with corrupt system files, drivers and registry issues that prevent you from booting. While it is true that malware can hide here, Ad-aware by default scans the System Restore folder as does the Avast Boot Time scan. What I have found to be extremely useful is to install an updated AV (such as Avast) on an infected machine and run an Adaware scan. Since most realtime AV programs even Avast (in real time) will ignore those files until accessed, Adaware will access them and any infected files that Adaware does not scan for (Viruses ect...) your AV will now catch.

Offline polonus

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Re: All about system restore.
« Reply #7 on: May 04, 2006, 09:28:26 AM »
Hi Mastertech,

I have experienced lately that some spyaudit techs indeed use a minimal combination of programs with a role here for Ad-Aware and the resources that Win XP (Pro) SP2 has aboard, and incremental backups every week (on DVD). There were days that it was fashion to run the shell-program Hitman Pro on customer-machines (80$ per month if out-sourced). But this has been proven to be "overkill" sometimes, and automatic audits are not the thing security-admins like very much. They like to know what happens on their machines, and have a firm grip on them.
That is why an important asap anti-malware forum in the Netherlands backed away from this Hitman Pro program recently. HJT and start-up analyzing in combination with registry analyzing and cache cleaning tools and special malware uninstalling scripts can help in many a case. Patching, keeping software up to date, and in-browser security is the best line of defense, that is called precaution. I like for instance siteadvisor, fileadvisor, browser AV plug-ins, because you could always be one click away from the next malware infection. Webmasters have a lot of room, also in the malicious theater, always be aware, that is the best way, else the repairman is taking it all, which is not bad for his business, but not my first priority.

polonus

polonus
« Last Edit: May 04, 2006, 09:33:32 AM by polonus »
Cybersecurity is more of an attitude than anything else. Avast Evangelists.

Use NoScript, a limited user account and a virtual machine and be safe(r)!