Author Topic: Security through obscurity  (Read 2906 times)

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Offline polonus

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Security through obscurity
« on: May 27, 2006, 11:26:32 PM »
Hi malware fighters,

Security through obscurity is almost always a bad idea. So is the following encoding tool. Read here why: http://itsit.nl/klaphek/scrdec.html

polonus
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Offline igor

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Re: Security through obscurity
« Reply #1 on: May 28, 2006, 12:15:12 AM »
Well, although the statement is usually right, I'm not sure if this is the right example.
I mean, what significantly better method for script scrambling would you suggest?

Offline polonus

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Re: Security through obscurity
« Reply #2 on: May 28, 2006, 12:23:45 AM »
Hi igor,

As you say, Script Scrambler 2.0, from here: http://www.cgiconnection.com/cgi-bin/cgi-con/system.cgi?area=scripts&docs=4300

polonus
« Last Edit: May 28, 2006, 12:26:10 AM by polonus »
Cybersecurity is more of an attitude than anything else. Avast Evangelists.

Use NoScript, a limited user account and a virtual machine and be safe(r)!

Offline igor

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Re: Security through obscurity
« Reply #3 on: May 28, 2006, 12:38:23 AM »
Appart from the fact that this tool is for perl (and not JavaScript or VBScript), I don't think there's much difference here (I've actually wrote a similar (OK, maybe better :)) tool for JavaScript long time ago).
Yes, it changes the names of the variables, and possibly removes the comments, so it removes some information for the source - but it's quite easy to convert the file back to a readable form (by writing an "inverse" tool).

The basic source has to be there (so that the browser can interpret it) - so no method can really secure it.