Author Topic: Should I disconnect the Internet connection, etc. while scanning my computer?  (Read 9865 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

XINLAI-A

  • Guest
Hi, Tech.

When I'm running Avast to scan my computer? Should I disconnect the Internet connection. and close all the programs running?
I'm a Newbie, so... Thanks for your help, anyway. :)

Offline Lisandro

  • Avast team
  • Certainly Bot
  • *
  • Posts: 67198
No. You don't have to do so. You can, but you don't have to.
avast will scan on-demand (by your order) and the resident will do its job with the Internet and other running programs.
The best things in life are free.

Offline DavidR

  • Avast √úberevangelist
  • Certainly Bot
  • *****
  • Posts: 88415
  • No support PMs thanks
If you do as you suggest then there will be no other activity which would effectively shorten the scan duration. But there is no harm in leaving other applications running, etc.
Windows 10 Home 64bit/ Acer Aspire F15/ Intel Core i5 7200U 2.5GHz, 8GB DDR4 memory, 256GB SSD, 1TB HDD/ avast! free 23.10.6086 (build 23.10.8563.800) UI 1.0.784/ Firefox, uBlock Origin, uMatrix/ MailWasher Pro/ Avast! Mobile Security

PiCo

  • Guest
Actually some trojans are using the Internet connection to replicate themselves into a same or other type of trojan as soon as an AV makes a detection on them and deletes them.

It's like an "insurance policy" for the trojan  ;D

I always do my scans in Safe Mode with disabled system restore and unplugged network cable.

Offline Lisandro

  • Avast team
  • Certainly Bot
  • *
  • Posts: 67198
Actually some trojans are using the Internet connection to replicate themselves
And the antivirus should caught it...
Really, if the virus is there, with or without connection, the antivirus should caught it... ::)
The best things in life are free.

XINLAI-A

  • Guest
No. You don't have to do so. You can, but you don't have to.
avast will scan on-demand (by your order) and the resident will do its job with the Internet and other running programs.


Thanks for your reply, tech. :)

From what you're saying, it means I can still use my computer to do any other work while the scanning, right?

And, by the way, I got another question. Does Avast protect the computer against Adware?  I scanned my computer the other days, and the Avast told me there's a Adware found in the E Disk, but when I was trying to move to the chest, it didn't work.
So, does Avast protect the computer against Adware?  If not, could you recommend another one to protect my computer against Adware?

Thank you.

Offline Lisandro

  • Avast team
  • Certainly Bot
  • *
  • Posts: 67198
From what you're saying, it means I can still use my computer to do any other work while the scanning, right?
Yes. Although it will be a little slower than usually.

And, by the way, I got another question. Does Avast protect the computer against Adware?  I scanned my computer the other days, and the Avast told me there's a Adware found in the E Disk, but when I was trying to move to the chest, it didn't work.
So, does Avast protect the computer against Adware?  If not, could you recommend another one to protect my computer against Adware?
Yes, it does protects you against adware.
If you want a second opinion, just for on-demand scannings, try SuperAntispyware.
The best things in life are free.

XINLAI-A

  • Guest
Yes, it does protects you against adware.
If you want a second opinion, just for on-demand scannings, try SuperAntispyware.
[/quote]


Hi, tech.
Thanks for your reply. ;D
When I scan my computer using Avast, which tells me Adware was found.

File name: E:\System Volume Information\_restore{02C571B5-C517-4C45-9409
Malware name: Win32:Adware-gen [Adw]
Malware type: Adware
VPS version: 080510-0, 05/10/2008

But when I'm trying to move this adware to chest,  I get a message like this:  this operation is not supported for this type of archive.
Why?

Offline DavidR

  • Avast √úberevangelist
  • Certainly Bot
  • *****
  • Posts: 88415
  • No support PMs thanks
It may be because it is trying to extract from an archive and it is unable to do that, probably the best option is to clear the E:\System Volume Information folder by disabling system restore for that drive and rebooting. This will clear ALL restore points, you can then enable the system restore for that drive.

Is the E: drive your windows partition/drive ?
Windows 10 Home 64bit/ Acer Aspire F15/ Intel Core i5 7200U 2.5GHz, 8GB DDR4 memory, 256GB SSD, 1TB HDD/ avast! free 23.10.6086 (build 23.10.8563.800) UI 1.0.784/ Firefox, uBlock Origin, uMatrix/ MailWasher Pro/ Avast! Mobile Security

Offline Lisandro

  • Avast team
  • Certainly Bot
  • *
  • Posts: 67198
XINLAI-A, probably David's suggestion it the best one.
Anyway, if you do not use that restore point, it will be automatically deleted by Windows in the future, replacing it with new restore points.
But if the virus is in your computer and 'using' the restore folder to replicate, I suggest:

1. Disable System Restore and reenable it after step 3.
2. Clean your temporary files.
3. Schedule a boot time scanning with avast with archive scanning turned on.
4. Use SUPERantispyware and/or Spyware Terminator to scan for spywares and trojans. If any infection is detected, better and safer is send the file to Quarantine than to simple delete than.
5. Test your machine with anti-rootkit applications. I suggest avast! antirootkit or Trend Micro RootkitBuster.
6. Make a HijackThis log to post here or, better, submit the RunScanner log to to on-line analysis.
7. Immunize your system with SpywareBlaster or Windows Advanced Care.
8. Check if you have insecure applications with Secunia Software Inspector.
The best things in life are free.