Author Topic: Mac + PC version of Avast  (Read 10304 times)

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fairlane32

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Mac + PC version of Avast
« on: January 14, 2011, 08:51:01 PM »
Hello. After receiving a notification from Download.com that there was a new engine update for windows (5.1.889) and one of the features it now supports is a boot-time scan for x64bit versions of OS's, is this feature also available for Snow Leopard? I see that in the Sticky thread above, that the last comment was made in June of 2010, has the Mac version been updated with this or not yet?

I am deciding whether to use Avast for my Mac machine which I have running Windows Enterprise x64bit Bootcamped. Is the current version for this license a version 5 or an older version?  What version will the Mac side be running? The Windows side?

Has the Mail issues that have been plagued by 3.07 et al been addressed?   ;D

Thanks,

Philip

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Re: Mac + PC version of Avast
« Reply #1 on: January 15, 2011, 01:22:17 PM »
Hello. After receiving a notification from Download.com that there was a new engine update for windows (5.1.889) and one of the features it now supports is a boot-time scan for x64bit versions of OS's, is this feature also available for Snow Leopard? I see that in the Sticky thread above, that the last comment was made in June of 2010, has the Mac version been updated with this or not yet?

I am deciding whether to use Avast for my Mac machine which I have running Windows Enterprise x64bit Bootcamped. Is the current version for this license a version 5 or an older version?  What version will the Mac side be running? The Windows side?

Has the Mail issues that have been plagued by 3.07 et al been addressed?   ;D

Thanks,

Philip

The Mac Version Does Not Include a Boot-Time Scanner. The Mac + PC license entitles you to run the current release for both versions (5.1 for Windows and 3.11 for Mac). The Mail scanner is working ok in 3.11 here for me, I have not had issues since the 2.7x releases.
"People who are really serious about software should make their own hardware." - Alan Kay

fairlane32

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Re: Mac + PC version of Avast
« Reply #2 on: January 15, 2011, 05:15:46 PM »
I visited an Apple Store near me last night and asked about AV/AS for the Mac and he replied with chagrin that av/as software is a waste of money on a mac and proceeded to tell me that in the past 10-20 yrs maybe about 5 bad trojans were found, and even then the most damage that was done was because the user unknowingly let it run.

 I know a little bit about security philosophy and his response didn't sit well with me; I know there have been a lot less reported attacks on macs than on windows machines, but to me, the operative word is reported , meaning who knows what else is out there that may not be getting caught since hardly anyone uses a scanner for a mac machine. My thinking is as more folks buy macs, and as Apple's market continues to climb, malware writers will start to target mac users more. Does this make sense to anyone? In case you are thinking of the "the problem lies between your keyboard and your chair" syndrome, my surfing/computing behavior doesn't take me to the dark corners of the Internet. A mac friend of mine pointed out that unlike windows, which will execute without windows catching the process to alert the user that something is trying to run,  "Are you sure you want to allow xyz to run", is something a mac would do, in which a user (ultimately responsible) may, or may not allow it. The argument of people's skill level aside, I replied to him that malware writers may one day find a way around this built-in mac check tool (if they haven't already) that will allow malware to run unhindered. In that respect, its probably better to be safe than sorry.

Any comments?

Philip

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Re: Mac + PC version of Avast
« Reply #3 on: January 16, 2011, 07:11:41 PM »
The Apple Store staff was right that ther have been very few attacks on th Mac.  This is not because the Mac is any more secure than any other OS, it's simply it's small market share. There will be a point where attackers start to think the market share is high enough to start attacking the Mac, it could be this year, or it may never grow that large.

I do not think that a AV program is a absolute requirement for mac users yet, but it's something that is nice to have if for nothing else than to keep you from spreading windows viruses to other users.

Apple also does not have a very long support cycle for Mac OS X. Typically they only support the current and the prior release, giving any release of OS X about a 4 year support cycle as opposed to Windows' nearly 10 years. This could be an issue for users of older Macs if such malware attacks should ever become commonplace.
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fairlane32

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Re: Mac + PC version of Avast
« Reply #4 on: January 17, 2011, 07:15:14 PM »

Apple also does not have a very long support cycle for Mac OS X. Typically they only support the current and the prior release, giving any release of OS X about a 4 year support cycle as opposed to Windows' nearly 10 years. This could be an issue for users of older Macs if such malware attacks should ever become commonplace.

That's a good point; those folks who own older macs that Apple won't patch anymore may be susceptible to malware. But wouldn't it be the job of the av/as vendor to keep up with current threats? I mean, yes, they would keep up-to-date av/as engine/definitions for older macs, but obviously it would help out also if Apple could plug any holes that may be found after they announce that say, 10.6.6 isn't supported anymore. :P

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Re: Mac + PC version of Avast
« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2011, 01:33:44 PM »
I visited an Apple Store near me last night and asked about AV/AS for the Mac and he replied with chagrin that av/as software is a waste of money on a mac and proceeded to tell me that in the past 10-20 yrs maybe about 5 bad trojans were found, and even then the most damage that was done was because the user unknowingly let it run.

 I know a little bit about security philosophy and his response didn't sit well with me; I know there have been a lot less reported attacks on macs than on windows machines, but to me, the operative word is reported , meaning who knows what else is out there that may not be getting caught since hardly anyone uses a scanner for a mac machine. My thinking is as more folks buy macs, and as Apple's market continues to climb, malware writers will start to target mac users more. Does this make sense to anyone? In case you are thinking of the "the problem lies between your keyboard and your chair" syndrome, my surfing/computing behavior doesn't take me to the dark corners of the Internet. A mac friend of mine pointed out that unlike windows, which will execute without windows catching the process to alert the user that something is trying to run,  "Are you sure you want to allow xyz to run", is something a mac would do, in which a user (ultimately responsible) may, or may not allow it. The argument of people's skill level aside, I replied to him that malware writers may one day find a way around this built-in mac check tool (if they haven't already) that will allow malware to run unhindered. In that respect, its probably better to be safe than sorry.

Any comments?

Philip

Hallo,
this is just urban legend and a historical consequence - macos platform as is is far less secure than its fundamental unix counterparts, because there are many strange add-ons which don't contribute to the original strong user-separation principle.
So, the low coint of malware is just because there weren't very much macos x machines used (in comparison with windows platform).

So, we can expect the situation on MacOS isn't as ideal, as those rumours say, and will be even worse, in the future...

regards,
pc
May's Law: Software efficiency halves every 18 months, compensating Moore's Law. (David May, INMOS)