Author Topic: OSX.Trojan.iServices.B  (Read 7522 times)

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Offline rundlemp

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OSX.Trojan.iServices.B
« on: January 27, 2009, 04:35:59 AM »
I've been running through the major Mac clients, Symantec, ClamXav, etc.  Wondering if the first ever real trojans for OS X are being covered.  So far, I have a 0 for ClamXav and Symantec.  Now i'm wondering if Avast is on it.

Offline .: Mac :.

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Re: OSX.Trojan.iServices.B
« Reply #1 on: January 27, 2009, 05:17:30 AM »
From my knowledge this is the trojan that is in some of the pirated copies of iWork. So no one should even have this trojan, unless they are breaking copyright laws ::).

I don't know if avast currently detects it, but you can monitor what is added to the virus database here:
http://www.avast.com/eng/vps_history.html
« Last Edit: January 27, 2009, 05:19:18 AM by .: Mac :. »
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Offline OU-User

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Re: OSX.Trojan.iServices.B
« Reply #2 on: January 27, 2009, 10:44:59 AM »

Quote
I don't know if avast currently detects it, but you can monitor what is added to the virus database here:
http://www.avast.com/eng/vps_history.html

I was wondering about detection for this and the last one and is worried that searching that history finds neither a or b or any OSX malware listed. Would like to know for certain if AVAST does detect these and other OSX malware

Regards, David
Trailing the software on a Mac before I buy!


Offline zilog

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Re: OSX.Trojan.iServices.B
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2009, 06:29:58 PM »

Quote
I don't know if avast currently detects it, but you can monitor what is added to the virus database here:
http://www.avast.com/eng/vps_history.html

I was wondering about detection for this and the last one and is worried that searching that history finds neither a or b or any OSX malware listed. Would like to know for certain if AVAST does detect these and other OSX malware

Regards, David
Trailing the software on a Mac before I buy!



well, we catch OSX malware in general too. just check it. in the case that your partocular sample wouldn't be detected, feel free to send it to virus@avast.com (as a password-protected zip, to pass through mail gateways).

regards,
pc
May's Law: Software efficiency halves every 18 months, compensating Moore's Law. (David May, INMOS)

Offline Ilgaz

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Re: OSX.Trojan.iServices.B
« Reply #4 on: February 04, 2009, 03:36:37 PM »
Can we clear this? Will Avast detect even the most simple, non virus/worm malware for OS X no matter how hard to get them?

It is not the case for a certain open source product and I am completely against that idea.

Also does Avast/OS X detect scripting exploits etc. which are becoming a big threat every day?

Offline zilog

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Re: OSX.Trojan.iServices.B
« Reply #5 on: February 05, 2009, 02:39:10 PM »
Can we clear this? Will Avast detect even the most simple, non virus/worm malware for OS X no matter how hard to get them?

It is not the case for a certain open source product and I am completely against that idea.

Also does Avast/OS X detect scripting exploits etc. which are becoming a big threat every day?

It's simple - we're doing our best to catch all malware that's known to us. It's allways about particular infection type/,alware sample, not about those names (which are vague in general - you can hardly find a particular virus infection that's labeled with the same identification by all AV products, see virustotal.com).

Anyway, the database is global for all Avast products -> "viruses and worm" section of this forum.
http://forum.avast.com/index.php?board=4.0
« Last Edit: February 05, 2009, 02:55:38 PM by zilog »
May's Law: Software efficiency halves every 18 months, compensating Moore's Law. (David May, INMOS)